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NSCC Cumberland hoists the flag on occupational safety

Cumberland County Municipal Warden Al Gillis (left) and acting-principal Andrew Moore for Nova Scotia Community College’s Cumberland Campuses championed the start of North America Occupational Health and Safety Week at the Springhill campus on May 7.
Cumberland County Municipal Warden Al Gillis (left) and acting-principal Andrew Moore for Nova Scotia Community College’s Cumberland Campuses championed the start of North America Occupational Health and Safety Week at the Springhill campus on May 7. - Christopher Gooding

SPRINGHILL – It’s a tradition 21-years strong but one many would like to see become obsolete.

Nova Scotia Community College’s across the province participated in the kickoff for the 21st North American Occupational Health and Safety [NAOSH] week. Workplace safety and accident prevention has come a long way over the last two decades, but workplace accidents and deaths continue, keeping the week-long focus relevant.

Cumberland Campus acting principal Andrew Moore says NSCC delivers a workplace safety message to staff, students and faculty all year-round and are proud to deliver safety education in each course as part of the ongoing fundamental skills students need before entering their chosen profession.

“Workplace injuries are preventable and with improved safety awareness such instances may be eliminated,” Moore said. “The goal of NAOSH week is focus the attention of employers, employees, the general public and all partners in occupational health and safety on the importance of preventing injuries and fatalities in the workplace.”

Partners throughout Canada, the United States and Mexico will use this week to raise the profile of occupation safety, Moore said. Increasing awareness of how workplace safety benefits the economy is one role the week serves, but more importantly, Moore said, it delivers a message to tomorrow’s workforce that no one should have to worry about being injured on the job, or worse.

According to the Workers Compensation Board of Nova Scotia, in 2016 the board investigated more than 5,800 serious injury incidents in the province, down from more than 6,000 investigations the previous year. Early indications for 2017 are the number of serious injuries has risen.   

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