No nation is born on the battlefield

Published on April 21, 2017

Having attended Sandy Fairbanks excellent presentation to the Tantramar Seniors’ College on “Confederation - Conceived in Charlottetown, Born on Vimy Ridge” and having just finished Pierre Berton’s detailed book Vimy on Easter Monday, the day in 1917 that the Canadians took the Ridge, considered by the Germans to be impregnable, I was aware that both the British and the French had been unable to take it and that months of planning and preparation went into the success.  

The Canadians used innovative tactics that involved educating every soldier down to the smallest details of the attack.
So, I was struck by Russell Wangersky’s column, “No nation is born on the battlefield” in The Citizen-Record April 12, 2017.
I wholeheartedly agree with him and I was delighted to see in print his reasoning that there are “many more important measures” in what “builds a country” than success in battle.
He listed: sharing among disparate parts of the country, education for all, “an involved and active electorate”, the goal of safe drinking water, “fair access to medical care”, disaster relief worldwide.
I was very impressed.

Clare Christie
Amherst