Bill-C51 lacks oversight

Published on March 27, 2015

To the Editor,

Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, except when he is blatantly wrong. It also turns my crank when an individual tries to be sneaky and get a message across without being clear as to what he is supporting.

After reading Mr. Walters’ article of who he trusts and doesn't trust, I just had to write this letter.

He spends a great deal of time telling us who he doesn't trust, and then finishes up by telling us he trusts the Minister of Public Safety Steven Blaney, after all he is supposedly an engineer, and he goes on to tell us we should just let our police get on with their job.

Here is why I say he is being sneaky and in my view disrespecting the intelligence of his readers. Mr. Blaney is trying to get Bill C-51 through the House of Commons and is in fact at the present holding hearings on this bill in Ottawa.

This is a bill that would expand CSIS powers with no new oversight and has been roundly criticized by all former prime ministers of every party including the Conservatives.

Every jurist, and there have been many opinion's from respected ones, has condemned it as an infringement on basic rights and have said it will not be able to face a court challenge against the rights and freedom charter act.

As for trusting our police to get on with their jobs, it seems to me if I remember rightly the RCMP when they were running the intelligence service with little or no oversight, wound up burning barns in Quebec and breaking the law. This is why we have CSIS.

So do we now want to have CSIS with expanded powers and no or little oversight out there performing dirty tricks as the RCMP once did?

My advice to you Mr. Walters is if you support Bill C-51, then you should have the courtesy to say so instead of being sneaky. Also I would like to add that without a free press a lot of things that are hurtful to our democratic way of life would go untold.

You may not trust the press, but they do not lie.

Walter Jones,

Amherst