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Surprise delivery to South Shore food bank from 16-year-old

Charlotte White of the Queens County Food Bank got a welcome surprise when 16-year-old Ben Hatt delivered $150 worth of groceries. It was his contribution from the Royal Bank of Canada’s Make 150 Count program. He’s helped here by a group of friends from Liverpool High School, who helped him carry the groceries in.
Charlotte White of the Queens County Food Bank got a welcome surprise when 16-year-old Ben Hatt delivered $150 worth of groceries. It was his contribution from the Royal Bank of Canada’s Make 150 Count program. He’s helped here by a group of friends from Liverpool High School, who helped him carry the groceries in.

LIVERPOOL, N.S. - Charlotte White wasn’t expecting it – but it couldn’t have come a better time.

The co-director of the Queens County Food Bank was worried about filling her shelves because Monday’s storm had prevented Feed Nova Scotia’s truck from making its regular delivery to Liverpool.

Then in walked 16-year-old Ben Hatt of Milton, carrying $150 worth of groceries that he had purchased that afternoon to give to the food bank.

Hatt was chosen by the Liverpool Branch of the Royal Bank of Canada to be the only resident to take part in a program called Make $150 Count. That program, meant to celebrate Canada’s 150th birthday, gave youth across the country $150 in cash. The only catch – they had to use it to improve their community.

Hatt says he wasn’t sure why he was chosen for the program – he didn’t apply. He thinks it’s because he does a lot of volunteer work in his community.

“They just said my name has been put forward by people in the community,” he said while helping unpack his gifts at the food bank. “As someone who is active and always gives back and just volunteers my time.”

Hatt is a peer tutor, he plays on multiple sports, he is a member of Key Club, and runs a community basketball program for children.

Hatt was given the money about three weeks ago and he spent the time trying to figure out the best thing to do with it.

“So many ideas. I couldn’t even decide on one. I thought of so many different things to do. It was just about giving back and I thought the food bank was a great place to do it.”

Hatt shopped for the supplies himself, but he had received a list from someone who volunteered at the food bank.

“It felt really good, just watching the price, and thinking wow this $150 look what it can do. It can do so much for the community.”

Charlotte White had no idea Hatt was coming with his supplies.

“This is a wonderful donation,” she said. “It couldn’t come at a better time because Christmas we always have lots of clients. For a young fella like that to have that much insight to help out is really wonderful.”

She said the storm the day before had prevented the food truck from coming.

“Most other food banks, if the truck didn’t come the food bank wouldn’t be open. But its from people like these young people our shelves are stocked enough that we could be open.”

 

The co-director of the Queens County Food Bank was worried about filling her shelves because Monday’s storm had prevented Feed Nova Scotia’s truck from making its regular delivery to Liverpool.

Then in walked 16-year-old Ben Hatt of Milton, carrying $150 worth of groceries that he had purchased that afternoon to give to the food bank.

Hatt was chosen by the Liverpool Branch of the Royal Bank of Canada to be the only resident to take part in a program called Make $150 Count. That program, meant to celebrate Canada’s 150th birthday, gave youth across the country $150 in cash. The only catch – they had to use it to improve their community.

Hatt says he wasn’t sure why he was chosen for the program – he didn’t apply. He thinks it’s because he does a lot of volunteer work in his community.

“They just said my name has been put forward by people in the community,” he said while helping unpack his gifts at the food bank. “As someone who is active and always gives back and just volunteers my time.”

Hatt is a peer tutor, he plays on multiple sports, he is a member of Key Club, and runs a community basketball program for children.

Hatt was given the money about three weeks ago and he spent the time trying to figure out the best thing to do with it.

“So many ideas. I couldn’t even decide on one. I thought of so many different things to do. It was just about giving back and I thought the food bank was a great place to do it.”

Hatt shopped for the supplies himself, but he had received a list from someone who volunteered at the food bank.

“It felt really good, just watching the price, and thinking wow this $150 look what it can do. It can do so much for the community.”

Charlotte White had no idea Hatt was coming with his supplies.

“This is a wonderful donation,” she said. “It couldn’t come at a better time because Christmas we always have lots of clients. For a young fella like that to have that much insight to help out is really wonderful.”

She said the storm the day before had prevented the food truck from coming.

“Most other food banks, if the truck didn’t come the food bank wouldn’t be open. But its from people like these young people our shelves are stocked enough that we could be open.”

 

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