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['Viewpoint with Rev. Don Miller, First Baptist Church']
['Viewpoint with Rev. Don Miller, First Baptist Church']

Viewpoint with Rev. Don Miller

On more than one occasion I am reminded of my early lessons that continue to teach me some good wisdom. My parents didn’t really set out to tell me life lessons. They simply lived them.

When I was a rebellious teen I would often test my Mom’s patience, and we would have a few squabbles. My dad was a barber, and one time when I sat in his chair, I began complaining about my mom, and how unreasonable were her demands to clean my bedroom, eat her cooking, brush my teeth or whatever else made me feel so ill-used. My dad was very quiet, so I assumed I was finding an ally. So, I continued to explain that she was unreasonable, ridiculous, and even a bully.

My dad finally had heard enough and said one final response: “That’s my wife your talking about.” Finally, I silenced my case. (He also had a pair of scissors in his hand.)

With a small response, I understood some important things. They were a couple. They were a team. Even if they had issues, they quickly defended each other. I understood some important things. They were a couple. They were a team. Even if they had issues, they quickly defended each other. From the vows on their wedding day, to the unwritten bonds they made with the birth of every child, every decision, every opportunity, their partnership was sealed in respect, kindness and love. Good partners even help each other to become good parents when they present a united front.

I know my parents love each another. And that love instilled a lot in a child: We feel safe, committed to, appreciated and loved unconditionally. (I may have even taxed a few of those ‘unconditions’.) They were not only committed to each other and parenthood, but they were also committed to raise their children in faith. I know they pray for me every day.

The efforts, prayers, and compromises of every marriage, has a ripple effect on their offspring.

This Father’s Day, the best way to love your child is to adore their mom. It will teach them how to be committed, how to endure their difficulties, how to overcome challenges and how to teach life lessons to their own children, by simply living them.

On this Father’s Day weekend, I thank my Dad for his lifelong disciple to ethics, thank Mom for her loving endurance, and thank them both for their commitment to one another.

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