Top News

Digby County brewers use Nova Scotia oranges in first beer batch of its kind

Andy and Erin Norman, inside Lazy Bear Brewing. The couple started the brewery last spring.
Andy and Erin Norman, inside Lazy Bear Brewing. The couple started the brewery last spring.

SMITH'S COVE, N.S. – An event will be held Feb. 3, which will feature local beer brewed with a surprising variety of local produce.

The aptly-named event, called ‘Taster Night: Orange Kolsch,’ will feature Lazy Bear Brewing’s new batch of Kolsch beer and will be held at Bunchberry Nurseries in Upper Clements from 7-9 p.m.

This is the first time Nova Scotia-grown oranges have been used to brew beer.

Erin Norman, who owns and operates the brewery with her husband Andy, said they got the idea when Bunchberry Nurseries had a rare and unusual plant sale. Andy, 33, who loves unique plants, spotted the orange tree and asked the owners if they could have some of its oranges. The owners said yes, as long as they returned the seeds.

The aptly-named event, called ‘Taster Night: Orange Kolsch,’ will feature Lazy Bear Brewing’s new batch of Kolsch beer and will be held at Bunchberry Nurseries in Upper Clements from 7-9 p.m.

This is the first time Nova Scotia-grown oranges have been used to brew beer.

Erin Norman, who owns and operates the brewery with her husband Andy, said they got the idea when Bunchberry Nurseries had a rare and unusual plant sale. Andy, 33, who loves unique plants, spotted the orange tree and asked the owners if they could have some of its oranges. The owners said yes, as long as they returned the seeds.

The couple then got together, developed a brew recipe, and got to work.

“There’s been lots of curiosity surrounding this particular batch,” said Erin. “We want as many people to try it as possible, while it lasts.”

The oranges used are called Japanese Bitter and were a small harvest, each growing only to the approximate size of a ping pong ball. The entirety of the orange was used in the brewing process – peel included.

The whole harvest of oranges resulted in a single batch of beer, which is fine with the couple. It was designed to all be sold at the event, with any leftovers being brought to the next Annapolis Royal Farmers and Traders Market.

The owners describe the beer as having an orangey nose, followed by bitter orange-peel nuances, and that the clean tasting German-style Kolsch is well suited to orange flavours.

“It’s nice and subtle,” said Andy Norman. “We didn’t want it to be overpowering.”

Non-alcoholic ginger ale will also be served at the event.

Erin, 34, attributes the brewery’s success to people’s desire to support local businesses, and to the craft beer trend sweeping Atlantic Canada.

“We have a great time doing this, and have regulars coming for tastings every Thursday. We always look forward to those nights,” said Erin.

 

STORY BY SARA ERICSSON

 

 

Recent Stories