Small and Special website helpful in research

Diana
Diana Tibert
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When I first searched the Small and Special database (http://www.smallandspecial.org/), I was impressed by the amount of details provided on the former patients of the Hospital for Sick Children in England. Of course, with every new database, the first thing I do is search for surnames in my family tree. Although I did not find any relatives, it was fascinating to read about the young patients.

When I first searched the Small and Special database (http://www.smallandspecial.org/), I was impressed by the amount of details provided on the former patients of the Hospital for Sick Children in England. Of course, with every new database, the first thing I do is search for surnames in my family tree. Although I did not find any relatives, it was fascinating to read about the young patients. For example, Mary Ann Best, born in 1858, had swallowed a tablespoon of American Potash. She was admitted to the hospital on Dec. 23, 1862. Tragically, after 53 days of suffering from potash poisoning and Scarlet Fever (contracted while a patient), she was delivered on Feb. 16, 1863. Marys file, like several others, contains case notes. These are digital images of hand-written records on the patients progress compiled by Dr. Charles West (one of the hospitals founders). They cover the period from 1852 to 1874. In Marys case, 13 pages reveal how she became ill, her day-to-day deterioration, and ultimate death. The images can be downloaded in a printable PDF file. To access the full information in the database, you must register. It costs nothing and helps to deter misuse of the information. Registering takes only a minute. They ask only for your name, email address, field of interest (most will choose family history) and affiliation (most will choose private individual.) Youll also need to create a password and enter random letters and numbers from an image into a box. This is to prevent automated spammers and harvesters from entering the database. Once registered, you receive an email. Click on the link in the message to go to the home page where you are automatically logged in. Located on Great Ormond Street, the hospital was Englands first in-patient childrens hospital. It opened Feb. 14, 1852 and closed Dec. 31, 1914. The online database contains more than 84,000 records. The main source of the information is the hospitals in-patient admission registers. Searches can be made by entering just a surname. They can also be performed by full name, age, date of birth, home address and several other factors, including if the patient died. For further search tips, click the patient details in the menu on the right of the screen. Information on several doctors, nurses and patients, and general information on the buildings and departments is found in the library section. Before leaving the website, visit the gallery to find fascinating photographs of patients (some are identified), the staff and the hospital. To protect the privacy of patients, only records more than 100 years old are identified. In other words, the records are available, but the names have been excluded. With each passing year, more records will be identified. The release of all information will be complete in Dec. 2014. Researchers File Seeking information on Elisha Clark(e) (1738 - 1784/5) who married Desire Gardiner in 1763 at Westerley, R.I. Their children (and spouses) were: Abigail (Gideon Corey), Elisha (Catherine Slipp), Jabez (Rebecca Burney/Birney), Benjamin and Isaac. Family lived at Newport Landing, NS (1793) and Hampstead, NB (1785/6). Contact Anne Clark-Stewart UE, 100 Granite Court, Kanata, ON, K2M 0A3; email: leisurelodge@sympatico.ca Diana Lynn Tibert is a freelance writer and genealogist. Submit queries to: RR#1 Milford, Hants County, NS, B0N 1Y0; website: http://www.thefamilyattic.info/Roots.html; email: tibert@ns.sympatico.ca

Organizations: Hospital for Sick Children, Birney

Geographic location: England, Great Ormond Street, Hants County

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