Local books of interest resources for genealogist

Diana
Diana Tibert
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Summer road trips are a great time to pick up books. Wherever I stop to shop or visit an exhibit, I search for the rack of local history books by local authors. After six days away from home, I have returned with three new books.

Summer road trips are a great time to pick up books. Wherever I stop to shop or visit an exhibit, I search for the rack of local history books by local authors. After six days away from home, I have returned with three new books. Occasionally, these small community books are available at large book stores, but most of mine were found in the community itself in a museum, exhibit or gift shop. Local authors, which are often the local historians, have difficulty getting their books into large book stores, so they work with local shops. This is where youll find titles like, Grannies Kitchen Recipes and Memories from Aunt Maude. If you see something interesting, dont wait until next year to buy it or to see if it is sold at the store where you live. Anywhere from 100 to 1,000 of these books are printed and once theyre gone, theyre gone. As far as pricing goes, I find the books quite reasonable. A small book or booklet might cost $2 to $5 while larger books cost from $10 to $30. Since it is summer, it is worth mentioning the treasures one might discover at yard sales. Sometimes in those stacks of Harlequin and Western novels a book written by a local historian is found. Some might say, why should I buy the book when I can borrow it from the library? Thats true. Some books can be borrowed and returned without further thought or use. However, whenever I can, I buy books with information directly concerning my family history. Books in my possession can be accessed immediately for reference, shared with other family members (who return books) and passed down to my children. As time passes, certain books become hard to find and if they are found can be extremely expensive. Those at libraries can be lost, permanently borrowed or thrown away when worn out. Having a copy in my possession increases the chance that my direct descendants will be able to read that book. Another good reason to buy a book written by a local author on local history is to support that author and any associations funding the publication. When these books are sold, it not only encourages the author to write another, but it might inspire other local historians with volumes of research to share their findings in book form. If these authors hadnt taken the time and money to create family and community history books, our knowledge of our local past would be sparse. Often, the information within these books has come from private or little-known sources or from records that would take days to search. If their books interest you or if they add to your family history, buy a book and tell others about it. Who knows, one of these books may knock down a brick wall. Researchers File Saturday, Oct. 20, 2007 (9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.): Middlemore Home Reunion 2007, Bible Hill Junior High School, 741 College Road, Bible Hill, Truro, NS. Special speaker will be Dr. Patricia Roberts-Pichette of the British Isles Family History Society of Greater Ottawa. For more information, contact Cecil Verge, Chair British Home Children and Descendants Association, phone: 902-681-6697; email: willowcb@auracom.com Editors Note - Diana Lynn Tibert is a freelance writer living at Milford, N.S. Submit queries to: RR#1 Milford, Hants County, NS B0N 1Y0; email: tibert@ns.sympatico.ca

Organizations: Bible Hill Junior High School, Chair British Home Children and Descendants Association

Geographic location: British Isles, Ottawa, Hants County

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