Family gatherings can be genealogy treasure-troves

Diana
Diana Tibert
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We call it a corn boil. Others call it a barbecue, a picnic or a reunion. Either way, stick family in front of any of those words and you have a get-together of genealogical proportions.

We call it a corn boil. Others call it a barbecue, a picnic or a reunion. Either way, stick family in front of any of those words and you have a get-together of genealogical proportions. Family gatherings are not new. Some have occurred every year for more than a hundred years. Some are small affairs with immediate family. Others are gatherings of hundreds of people descended from similar ancestors. Either way, these gatherings are great places to gather information for family trees. With summer approaching, reunions and similar genealogy-related events are filling the calendar. For example, the Collette Reunion takes place from August 3rd until the 5th at Buctouche. Previously held in 1989 and 1994, organizers are expecting people to come from all over North America to attend this years festivities. For further information, visit the website: http://www.collettereunion.com/accueil_en.html; or contact Ray Collette at (506) 389-2404; email: info@reunioncollette.com Besides single family reunions, community events focussed on genealogy and history are also taking place. If one is happening where your ancestors once lived, it might be worthwhile checking out the events. Whether you are attending the family or the community gathering, there are a few things to remember to take along to maximize the genealogy benefits. 1. Camera (to add photos to the family tree), extra batteries and film or memory cards. Record the names of the people and their positions in the photo (from left to right). 2. Old photos with unidentified people and family mysteries. 3. Notepad and pens to record names and other pertinent information along with phone numbers and mailing, e-mail and web addresses. 4. A printed copy of your family tree to show others, so they can correct and/or add to it. It might be a good idea to bring a few extra copies of the pedigree chart to share with family members. Even at first if not interested, once they see their name in print and begin reading about their surname, they might be inspired to add information. 5. A list of people you would like to talk to, and a list of information you have and dont have on each. 6. If you have created a family tree book, then bring lots of copies to sell or give away. 7. Business cards with your name, contact information, web page address and the surnames you are researching. They dont have to be professional. They can be created on your home computer using plain white paper or handwritten on looseleaf. As long as the information is printed neatly for everyone to read 8. Good listening ears, a cheerful disposition and a pleasant attitude. To help keep everyone informed, I have created the Atlantic Canadas Genealogy Calendar (http://www.thefamilyattic.info/RCalendar.html). Anyone can submit genealogy-related events to the address below. Researchers File Who were Annies and Johns parents? Annie Chisholm was born in 1851 and John McDonald was born 1848. Both were from Antigonish County. The couple had two sons, William A., born 1889, and Hugh, born 1892. Contact: Kathy McDonald, 2928 Willow Pond Dr., Maryville, TN 37803 USA; email: bkssoulmate@yahoo.com Diana Lynn Tibert is a freelance writer living at Milford, NS. Submit queries to: RR#1 Milford, Hants County, NS B0N 1Y0; email: tibert@ns.sympatico.ca

Organizations: RCalendar.html

Geographic location: North America, Antigonish County, Hants County

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