The everything family tree book

Diana
Diana Tibert
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When I visit book stores, I check out the genealogy section. Sometimes, it can be hard to find because it usually consists of about six titles or less. Some stores file them with community books, reference or how-to-books. Others put them with how-to-write and how-to-get-published books.

When I visit book stores, I check out the genealogy section. Sometimes, it can be hard to find because it usually consists of about six titles or less. Some stores file them with community books, reference or how-to-books. Others put them with how-to-write and how-to-get-published books. On one such visit, I purchased The Everything Family Tree Book - Finding, Charting, and Preserving Your Family History by William G. Hartley. It was on sale, so even though the cover price was $19.95, I only paid about $5 for it. One of the reasons I purchased the book was because it is genealogy from the United States point of view. Although basic genealogy is the same the world over, some topics, such as how to learn more about those who fought in the Civil War, only concern the U.S. Many in Atlantic Canada who had family involved in the shipping and fishing industry had members who travelled and/or lived in the States, particularly the New England states. My ancestors were no different. They went to Boston, Natick and towns in between. They married, had children and died there. Learning more about these ancestors can be difficult because all sources are not the same as those in Canada. For example, the beginning of recorded births, marriages and deaths vary between countries and even between states. The chart on page 36 provides the years when each state began recording vitals. The earliest birth and death records began in 1841 in Massachusetts. An interesting section in the book is surname origins and their meanings. Included is a short list of examples including Decker, German, house roofer; Grant, Old French, large or great man; Monroe, Scottish, lives by a red swamp; Owens, Old Welch, well-born one; and Underwood, English, at the foot of the forest. In the back of the book are five pedigree charts and five family group record charts. On pages 190 and 191 are the column headings for the 1790, 1800/1810, 1820, 1830/1840, 1860, 1880, 1900, 1910 and 1920 U.S. Censuses. This not only tells me what information is available for each census year, but also tells me when censuses were taken. In the center of the book, is a 4-Generation Family Tree Chart measuring 16 by 18 inches. It can be removed from the book and hung on the wall for quick reference. For beginners, this book will provide the basics on how to start your family tree, how to fill in the basic charts, which records provide what information, how to conduct interviews with family members and many more things that will help you on your way to creating a valuable collection of family history. In my experience, one book never answers all my questions. Ill add this one to my collect, but will be on the lookout for more. Researchers File Where were Dixon Roy Dick Regan and his wife, Edna Wade, buried? Was it Lunenburg County? Dixon, a First World War veteran, died in an industrial accident at Hantsport in October 1951. Edna died in 1949. Contact: Grandniece, Karla MacDonald, Box 262 Port Williams, Kings County, NS B0P 1T0. Diana Lynn Tibert is a freelance writer living at Milford, N.S. Submit queries to: RR#1 Milford, Hants County, NS B0N 1Y0; email: tibert@ns.sympatico.ca

Geographic location: United States, Atlantic Canada, New England Boston Natick Massachusetts Lunenburg County Port Williams Hants County

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