Publishing your family tree

Diana
Diana Tibert
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You may not be ready to publish your family tree. I dont even know if I am. But after 17 years of gathering information and storing it in one form or another, I think publishing it is the next logical step.

There are many reasons to publish a family tree book. Mine is to preserve the many hours of research and pass it on to family.

I have heard horror stories where decades of research has been tossed in the garbage after someone has diedin one case literally shovelled out her bedroom window into a waiting dumpster.

You may not be ready to publish your family tree. I dont even know if I am. But after 17 years of gathering information and storing it in one form or another, I think publishing it is the next logical step.

There are many reasons to publish a family tree book. Mine is to preserve the many hours of research and pass it on to family.

I have heard horror stories where decades of research has been tossed in the garbage after someone has diedin one case literally shovelled out her bedroom window into a waiting dumpster.

I hope my children have more respect for my research, but I cant guarantee it. The only way to guarantee its preservation is to publish it.

Most of us will fall into two categories when creating a family tree book: those who want to share with only family members and those who want to share with the public.

Regardless of the category, youll need to organize your research so everyone - genealogists and non-genealogists - will understand it. Some genealogists prefer strict formats such as the Burke Peerage or New England Register. Others use their own formats.

Getting your family tree into print can be done in several ways. If money is a factor and you have a good printer, print it yourself. Books can be bound for a reasonable fee at places like Staples and Kwik Kopy. You can create as many as you need when you need them.

Another way to get your family tree into print is by self-publishing through a professional publishing company. Prices vary depending on the company, size of the book and the number of books printed.

Some companies provide editing services while others print exactly what you send them. Proofread and double-check to make sure as many errors as possible are eliminated.

The other option is to pitch your genealogy manuscript to a publisher who will publish and sell it. However, unless you are related to a famous person, they are probably not interested.

Beware of vanity presses who ask you to pay for publishing your book and then charge you for any copies you want. Some of these companies ask for the copyright of your material. In essence, you will do all the work then give it away to a company who will make money from it.

Once the book is published, consider giving a copy to your local archives, genealogical society or museum.

Learn more about the publishing industry by visit the Writers Federation of Nova Scotia (http://www.writers.ns.ca/index.html). Helpful topics are Publishers and FAQ page which contains information on self-publishing.



Researchers File

Seeking information on Evan Corkill of Liverpool, England and his five children. Evans children arrived in Nova Scotia in the 1870s as British Home Children. One later moved to Massachusetts, one went to BC and three remained in Nova Scotia. Contact: Betty Fredericks, PO Box 84, No. Billerica, MA 01862 USA; email: bbffrrpp@comcast.net



Diana Lynn Tibert is a freelance writer living at Milford, NS. Submit genealogy queries by writing: RR#1 Milford, Hants County, NS B0N 1Y0; or email: tibert@ns.sympatico.ca

Organizations: Writers Federation of Nova Scotia

Geographic location: Nova Scotia, Liverpool, England Massachusetts Hants County

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