Warm weather continues to help advance crop development

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Saskatchewan livestock producers have 69 per cent of the 2013 hay crop cut and 43 per cent baled or put into silage, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture’s Crop Report for the period of July 16 to 22.

Rain showers and high humidity has slowed hay progress and decreased hay quality in some areas. Seventy-four per cent of the provincial hay crop is rated as good in quality.

Hay yields are slightly above the five-year average (2008-2012). The estimated average hay yields on dry land are reported as 1.5 tons per acre for alfalfa and alfalfa/brome hay, 1.3 tons per acre for other tame hay, one ton per acre for wild hay and two tons per acre for greenfeed.

On irrigated land, the estimated average hay yields are 2.5 tons per acre for alfalfa and alfalfa/brome hay, 2.2 tons per acre for other tame hay, one ton per acre for wild hay and four tons per acre for greenfeed.

The majority of crops are in good to excellent condition. Eighty-seven per cent of spring wheat, 82 per cent of canola, 80 per cent of lentils and 89 per cent of peas are in good to excellent condition.

Most parts of the province received varying amounts of rain last week ranging from trace to 91 millimeters.  Flooding, hail, wind and insects caused the majority of crop damage.

Across the province, topsoil moisture on cropland is rated as 12 per cent surplus, 80 per cent adequate and eight per cent short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as nine per cent surplus, 82 per cent adequate, eight per cent short and one per cent very short.

Farmers are busy haying and controlling insects and crop disease.

Organizations: Saskatchewan Agriculture

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