Lee selected to lead health board consolidation

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Quigley takes over as temporary CEO in Pictou County

Patrick Lee will lead the consolidation of Nova Scotia's health boards from 10 to two.

Patrick Lee will lead the consolidation of Nova Scotia's health boards from 10 to two.

HALIFAX – The government has chosen a senior health administrator to lead detailed planning as Nova Scotia consolidates its 10 health authorities into two.

Patrick Lee, president and CEO of Pictou County Health Authority, will lead the transition team and provide strategic and operational advice to government as the district health authority structure is reorganized.

"Mr. Lee is an experienced health-care leader and we are fortunate that he is going to lead the provincial transition team," said Leo Glavine, Health and Wellness Minister. "Mr. Lee and his team will play an important role in helping to design and plan the structure of the new health boards. His 33 years of experience in health care means that he brings practical experience and extensive knowledge to his new role."

The province is moving from 10 to two health authorities beginning April 1, 2015. There will be one authority for the province and one for the IWK Health Centre in Halifax.

"I am grateful for the confidence the government has demonstrated in me in making this appointment," said Lee. "I firmly believe that the new structure can be used to improve the quality of care and service in this province, and I look forward to working collaboratively with the soon-to-be announced provincial transition team and other stakeholders as we move to the new structure."

In his new role, Lee will report to the deputy minister of Health and Wellness. The deputy and Lee will choose the remaining members of the transition team, which is expected to be named shortly. Lee's appointment is until Sept. 30, with an opportunity for an extension, if needed.

The transition team will be responsible for helping to plan the new structure. A separate committee at the Department of Health and Wellness will look at matters of legislation, board governance and accountability.

The minister will name a group of senior community leaders from within the province's health-care sectors to advise him on issues about consolidation.

Lee has experience in emergency health, psychiatric health, and women's and children's health settings, including 11 years at the IWK Health Centre as a vice-president. He has worked in Ontario, P.E.I., New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. Since 2006, Mr. Lee has been president and CEO of Pictou County Health Authority.

"Change is already happening across the health-care system," said Glavine. "Health-care leaders are reinforcing the importance of enhanced patient care and safety and timely access to consistent care. As we reduce duplication across the system, we will be able to speed up this work and improve services to patients."

Bruce Quigley, CEO of Cumberland Health Authority will, in addition to his regular duties, become acting CEO of the Pictou County Health Authority.

For more information, visit  http://novascotia.ca/dhw/puttingpatientsfirst .

 

Organizations: Pictou County Health Authority, IWK Health Centre, Department of Health and Wellness Cumberland Health Authority

Geographic location: HALIFAX, Nova Scotia, Pictou County Ontario New Brunswick

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  • Harriet McCready
    April 22, 2014 - 08:26

    I was pleased learn that Patrick Lee will be leading this effort. He has a solid reputation among his colleagues and has been a strong advocate of professionalism in the field of health system administration. And Bruce Quigley is a capable leader who can easily manage the two districts during the transition. I sincerely hope the transition team fully understands the vital role managers and administrators play in health care delivery; cutting too deeply may compromise policy and planning functions and download a significant "paperwork" burden on front-line care providers.