Give me fuel, five me fire

Dave
Dave Mathieson
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Published on April 09, 2014

It wasn’t part of their training, but trainees in Level 1 firefighting took time out for a group photo Sunday in Parrsboro.

Published on April 09, 2014

Fire blasts from the font of the house while a firefighter points to where he would like the water to be sprayed. The water was used mostly to make sure the nearby powerlines weren't affected by the heat.

Published on April 09, 2014

Give me fuel, five me fire

Published on April 09, 2014

Give me fuel, five me fire

Published on April 09, 2014

Water was taken from this reservoir to the fire hoses.

Published on April 09, 2014

Water is drained from a fire truck to the reservoir.

Published on April 09, 2014

Give me fuel, five me fire

Published on April 09, 2014

Firefighters cut a hole through the roof.

Published on April 09, 2014

Firefighters don their breathing apparatus.

Published on April 09, 2014

Firefighters pose for a photo.

Published on April 09, 2014

Firefighters look at the photo's they took on their cell phones.

Published on April 09, 2014

A firefighter finishes taking a few photo's.

Published on April 09, 2014

Give me fuel, five me fire

Published on April 09, 2014

Give me fuel, five me fire

Published on April 09, 2014

Firefighters watch the house burn.

Fire training continues to increase in popularity

PARRSBORO – Cumberland County firefighters got a chance to put their skills to the test during training exercises Sunday in Parrsboro.

“In the morning we worked on approaching and attacking car and dumpster fires,” said Mike Carter, Fire Protection Service for the Municipality of Cumberland County.

Sixteen of the 18 fire departments in Cumberland County participated in the event, and in the afternoon they worked on house fires.

Also, Twenty-four of the participants are training towards working towards their Level 1 certification, and 14 other volunteer firefighters were there to help an instruct with the training.

“With the house we had some smaller fires with containers inside the house, and they went in with their breathing apparatus,” said Carter.

It was also an opportunity for experienced firefighters to work on rapid intervention, where people rescue firefighters if they’re down.

“We put a couple firefighters down in a room and covered them with a bunch of rubble and had a fire in the room and had a team go in and rescue them.”

The Level 1 students began their training Nov. 1, and will wrap up June 1.

“The firefighters do much of their training online, where they are assigned modules to work on,” said Carter. “We get together every four or five weeks and they will have to have a certain block (of modules) done.”

Carter said training online has helped with recruitment.

"They used to have to get together every second weekend and it was pretty time consuming, and pretty tough on families.”

Carter says numbers are up but they are always looking for new firefighters.

“The youngest we take is 16-years-old but we don’t let them do live fire,” said Carter. “They wouldn’t be recognized as fully qualified Level 1 until they’re 18.”

There are also three different levels for Level 1 – cold zone, warm zone and hot zone.

“If they complete the whole course they will be qualified to go into the hot zone, which means they can enter a structure,” said Carter. “The reason behind that is before people needed the whole Level 1 and that eliminated a lot of people, but some people might want to be a pump operator and we want to give them that opportunity.”

There is no cost to individuals who want to take training.

Anybody interested in becoming a firefighter can contact their local fire department.

 

Organizations: Fire Protection Service for the Municipality

Geographic location: Cumberland County, PARRSBORO

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