Mount Allison professor, students’ climate change work part of national exhibition at the Royal Ontario Museum

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On display until February

A series of multi-media projects with a Mount Allison connection are taking the national stage.

Mount Allison geography and environment professor Dr. Ian Mauro looks over the Carbon 14: Climate is Culture exhibition at the Royal Ontario Museum. The exhibition, featuring the work of Mount Allison University professors and students opened on Oct. 19.

SACKVILLE, N.B. — A series of multi-media projects with a Mount Allison connection are taking the national stage. 

Carbon 14: Climate is Culture opened Oct. 19 at the Royal Ontario Museum and features documentary and interactive films by Mount Allison geography and environment professor Dr. Ian Mauro and his Mount Allison team, including several recent graduates. 

The exhibit features two films completed by Mauro and his colleagues, an interactive iPad video cartography project, as well as photo exhibits from filming locations in both the Arctic and Atlantic regions.

Climate Change Atlantic was filmed and produced by the Mount Allison team throughout Atlantic Canada over the past two years. Qapirangajuq: Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change, the first Inuktitut language film documenting climate change in the Arctic, was produced by Mauro with filmmaker Zacharias Kunuk in 2010.

Mauro and Kunuk’s latest project, Our Baffinland, uses GPS-enabled video cameras to map Inuit knowledge regarding mining in Nunavut.

“We are honoured to have our work as part of the Climate is Culture exhibition at the ROM,” said Mauro. “The Mount Allison team has worked steadily with many community partners, such as the Fundy Biosphere Reserve, over the past two years to bring the film together. I think it’s very important to share this message of climate change and its effects — in this region and the Arctic — on a national stage.”

The production team behind Climate Change Atlantic includes Mount Allison grads Ben Phillips, Alissa Sylvester, and Bernard Soubry. Sylvester and Soubry both worked on the project while they were students at Mount Allison.

Phillips is currently the conservation program manager at the Fundy Biosphere Reserve and a lab instructor/technician in Mount Allison’s department of geography and environment.

He says, “We interviewed many Atlantic Canadians who have spent their entire lives working outdoors, and the climate change insights from these local knowledge experts are now being shared on a very large scale.”

The Climate Change Atlantic film will also be touring in the Maritime provinces this fall. David Suzuki, environmental advocate and host of CBC’s The Nature of Things, will join Mauro and his team at select screenings across the region.

Carbon 14: Climate is Culture continues until February 2, 2014 at the ROM.

Organizations: Royal Ontario Museum, Fundy Biosphere Reserve, CBC

Geographic location: Arctic, Atlantic Canada, Nunavut Maritime

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