National Aboriginal Day marked

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Preparations for a flag-raising

 

AMHERST – The Mi’kmaq man had a positive message to share at a flag-raising Friday morning in downtown Amherst to recognize National Aboriginal Day.

 “We’ve come a long way,” said Manson Gloade, an economic development officer with Aboriginal Affairs, about the status of aboriginal Canadians.

Gloade offered an opening and closing prayer at a ceremony held Friday morning outside Aboriginal Affairs on Havelock Street: raising the Mi’kmaq flag in recognition of June 21, National Aboriginal Day. Mayor Robert Small was on-hand to proclaim the date national Aboriginal Day in Amherst.

There is still work to be done – there will always be work to be done – according to Gloade, but a divide has been bridged. The Millbrook nation man said the event is representative of two major developments in the ongoing history of Canada and aboriginal peoples: recognition of the contribution aboriginal culture has made to the fabric of the country - as well as increased pride in first cultures – and an interest on the part of aboriginal communities in being part of the broader Canadian milieu.

Mayor Small said recognizing the need for cooperation between the aboriginal community and all Canadians is important.

Small said he’d recently returned from British Columbia, a province he felt is in the vanguard of improving relations between aboriginals, municipalities and their provincial government. He stressed the importance of educational opportunities, and felt progress in the development of the relationship can be made through outreach among children of all backgrounds.

He challenged Atlantic Canadians to step up and find opportunities to partner with First Nations.

The flag was raised by Constable Tom Wood of the Amherst Police Department. Also present for the ceremony were two locally-based representatives of the national police force, the RCMP: Const. Troy Gill and Const. John Wavrychuk – the latter dressed in red serge.

Patricia Ellis, in communications at Aboriginal Affairs, said the national day was first proclaimed in 1996.

Understanding between aboriginal Canadians and the rest of the country has “been increasing over the years,” she said.

She said more people attend events and ask questions, and progress has been made on some issues.

Ellis said she was unable to comment on a radio interview aired on a Moncton station Thursday on which it was claimed the federal government provides less per child funding for aboriginal kids than the provinces provide for their wards.

esparling@amherstdaily.com

@ADNsparling

AMHERST – The Mi’kmaq man had a positive message to share at a flag-raising Friday morning in downtown Amherst to recognize National Aboriginal Day.

 “We’ve come a long way,” said Manson Gloade, an economic development officer with Aboriginal Affairs, about the status of aboriginal Canadians.

Gloade offered an opening and closing prayer at a ceremony held Friday morning outside Aboriginal Affairs on Havelock Street: raising the Mi’kmaq flag in recognition of June 21, National Aboriginal Day. Mayor Robert Small was on-hand to proclaim the date national Aboriginal Day in Amherst.

There is still work to be done – there will always be work to be done – according to Gloade, but a divide has been bridged. The Millbrook nation man said the event is representative of two major developments in the ongoing history of Canada and aboriginal peoples: recognition of the contribution aboriginal culture has made to the fabric of the country - as well as increased pride in first cultures – and an interest on the part of aboriginal communities in being part of the broader Canadian milieu.

Mayor Small said recognizing the need for cooperation between the aboriginal community and all Canadians is important.

Small said he’d recently returned from British Columbia, a province he felt is in the vanguard of improving relations between aboriginals, municipalities and their provincial government. He stressed the importance of educational opportunities, and felt progress in the development of the relationship can be made through outreach among children of all backgrounds.

He challenged Atlantic Canadians to step up and find opportunities to partner with First Nations.

The flag was raised by Constable Tom Wood of the Amherst Police Department. Also present for the ceremony were two locally-based representatives of the national police force, the RCMP: Const. Troy Gill and Const. John Wavrychuk – the latter dressed in red serge.

Patricia Ellis, in communications at Aboriginal Affairs, said the national day was first proclaimed in 1996.

Understanding between aboriginal Canadians and the rest of the country has “been increasing over the years,” she said.

She said more people attend events and ask questions, and progress has been made on some issues.

Ellis said she was unable to comment on a radio interview aired on a Moncton station Thursday on which it was claimed the federal government provides less per child funding for aboriginal kids than the provinces provide for their wards.

The majority of those in attendance were officials, or employees of Aboriginal Affairs.

esparling@amherstdaily.com

@ADNsparling

Organizations: Aboriginal Affairs, First Nations, Amherst Police Department RCMP

Geographic location: AMHERST, Havelock Street, Millbrook Canada British Columbia Moncton

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