Landing gear 'folded up': Joyce's son

Staff ~ Transcontinental Media
Send to a friend

Send this article to a friend.

Gov't safety officials, team from aircraft maker dispatched

Coffee magnate Ron Joyce, co-founder of Tim Hortons, was one of 10 people on a luxury jet yesterday that crashed on landing at a private strip along the Northumberland Strait.

Coffee magnate Ron Joyce, co-founder of Tim Hortons, was one of 10 people on a luxury jet yesterday that crashed on landing at a private strip along the Northumberland Strait.
The 77-year-old businessman, who was travelling with seven other passengers and two pilots from Hamilton, sustained minor injuries when the aircraft's wing hit the runway at his exclusive Fox Harb'r golf resort, sending the plane spinning.
Tim Armstrong, one of the pilots on board and president of Jet Port Inc., which flies out of the golf resort, said the aircraft was damaged, but everyone on board was doing fine.
"We're all really thankful for that," Armstrong said from the resort soon after the 2:30 p.m. incident.
Cumberland District RCMP Const. Paul Calder said the plane encountered problems upon landing.
"The plane actually had touched down, and then it ran into difficulty once it was on the runway," he said.
Steven Joyce, Ron Joyce's son, was also on board the jet, and said it was a pretty bumpy flight before the crash.
"It's a pretty windy day, we were bouncing around a fair amount," he said.
He said the jet's landing gear "folded up" during the crash. He said the plane was brand-new, delivered to the resort just a month ago.
There was no fire, Calder said, but fire crews were on hand because fuel was aboard the jet.
Passengers and crew were examined by paramedics at the scene or taken to local hospitals, Calder said.
A couple of passengers were transferred for further examinations and X-rays, he added.
Ron Joyce, who started the doughnut chain with NHL defenceman Tim Horton in the 1960s, was taken to hospital.
"He's been taken out for further observation, but at this point, we believe he's fine," Armstrong said.
Officials with the Transportation Safety Board were sent to the scene yesterday evening.
Spokesman John Cottreau said the board would assess the crash and determine whether a full investigation is necessary.
Bombardier spokesman Leo Knaapen said the Transportation Safety Board had asked the Montreal-based company to assist with the investigation, and he said Bombardier would fully co-operate.
Members of the company's accident investigation team were also sent to the resort.
Calder didn't want to speculate about reasons for the crash, but said it had been snowing in the area since early Saturday evening, and there was wet, heavy snow throughout yesterday.
Ron Joyce, who owns several aircraft that fly out of the private resort, also owns the jet involved in yesterday's crash, which his son said was a Bombardier Global 5000.
Calder said as far as he knew, the jet was still intact, but had suffered some damage. - With files from The Canadian Press

Organizations: Tim Hortons, Bombardier, Jet Port Cumberland District RCMP Const. Transportation Safety Board NHL

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5

Thanks for voting!

Top of page

Comments

Comments