First World War art gets new home

Andrew
Andrew Wagstaff
Send to a friend

Send this article to a friend.

POW painting donated to military museum

AMHERST The scene of the painting is a partially submerged shipwreck, washing up onto a dark, rocky shore.

First World War art gets new home

AMHERST The scene of the painting is a partially submerged shipwreck, washing up onto a dark, rocky shore.

The painting is dated 1917 and signed by Volmer, who was a German prisoner of war in Amherst during the First World War, according to Dick Van Snick, who purchased it in an auction from the estate of Doug Biggs. He has since donated the piece of artwork to the military museum at the Amherst Armoury.

Quite possibly that was his ship, the last time he saw it, speculated museum manager Ray Coulson, who accepted the presentation from Van Snick recently. Thats where they got all their prisoners, really, the navy types off the coast.

Located near where Casey Concrete now sits, the Amherst camp was one of the largest POW camps during the war, containing German prisoners from submarines and merchant marine ships. It was also a detention camp for suspected spies in the area.

Quite likely the artist came from one of those ships, according to Coulson, who said a lot of German ships were caught off the East Coast.

Theyre very attached to their ships, the sailors, he said. Thats probably the last time he saw it, and it was in that condition, so thats the way he remembered to paint it.

He said it is tremendous that items like these have survived for almost 100 years in untouched condition.

I bought it probably just because of the significance of it, said Van Snick. Since I saw that Ray was collecting items that had historical significance, I thought it would be a good place for it.



awagstaff@amherstdaily.com

Geographic location: AMHERST, East Coast

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5

Thanks for voting!

Top of page

Comments

Comments