What started as an unblemished canvas above the lips and below the nose has turned into works of 'art' or in some cases prime examples of why shaving is a preferred morning ritual. Here are some of the local men of Movember who are willing to put aside self-respect to grow what they can and raise awareness and money for prostate cancer research.

They are your dads, uncles, brothers, husbands, sons and friends and they need your help raising money for through the month of 'Movember'. To support them, click here and follow the directions.

Adam Small Bill Munro Cayne Amos Daren White
Adam Small
Occupation: Insurance Specialist with Archway Barnes Insurance
Bill Munro
Occupation: Insurance Specialist with Archway Barnes Insurance
Cayne Amos
Occupation: Insurance Specialist with Archway Barnes Insurance
Daren White
Occupation: Teacher at Spring Street Academy
Adam Small Bill Munro Cayne Amos Daren White
Adam Small
Nov. 5
Bill Munro
Nov. 5
Cayne Amos
Nov. 5
Daren White
Nov. 5
Adam Small Bill Munro Cayne Amos Daren White
Adam Small
Nov. 9
Bill Munro
Nov. 9
Cayne Amos
Nov. 9
Daren White
Nov. 9
Adam Small Bill Munro Cayne Amos Daren White
Adam Small
Nov. 15
Bill Munro
Nov. 15
Cayne Amos
Nov. 15
Daren White
Nov. 15
Adam Small Bill Munro Cayne Amos Daren White
Adam Small
Nov. 21
Bill Munro
Nov. 21
Cayne Amos
Nov. 21
Daren White
Nov. 21
Adam Small Bill Munro Cayne Amos Daren White
Adam Small
Nov. 27
Bill Munro
Nov. 27
Cayne Amos
Nov. 27
Daren White
Nov. 27
Geoff Phinney Larry Cove Stephen LeBlanc Wade LeBlanc
Geoff Phinney
Occupation: Sales Manager at Amherst Toyota
Larry Cove Stephen LeBlanc
Occupation: Car Sales Associate at Amherst Toyota
Wade LeBlanc
Occupation: Teacher at E.B. Chandler Junior High
Geoff Phinney Larry Cove Stephen LeBlanc Wade LeBlanc
Geoff Phinney
Nov. 5
Larry Cove
Nov. 5
Stephen LeBlanc
Nov. 5
Wade LeBlanc
Nov. 5
Geoff Phinney Larry Cove Stephen LeBlanc Wade LeBlanc
Geoff Phinney
Nov. 9
Larry Cove
Nov. 9
Stephen LeBlanc
Nov. 9
Wade LeBlanc
Nov. 9
Geoff Phinney Larry Cove Stephen LeBlanc Wade LeBlanc
Geoff Phinney
Nov. 15
Larry Cove
Coming Soon
Stephen LeBlanc
Nov. 15
Wade LeBlanc
Unavailable
Geoff Phinney Larry Cove Stephen LeBlanc Wade LeBlanc
Geoff Phinney
Nov. 21
Larry Cove
Nov. 21
Stephen LeBlanc
Nov. 21
Wade LeBlanc
Nov. 22
Geoff Phinney Larry Cove Stephen LeBlanc Wade LeBlanc
Geoff Phinney
Nov. 27
Larry Cove
Nov. 27
Stephen LeBlanc
Nov. 27
Wade LeBlanc
Nov. 27

What's your Movember style?

Joan LeBlanc Mary Legere Nancy Michels Sharon Boudreau
Joan Leblanc Mary Legere Nancy Michels Sharon Boudreau
The handlebar one is cute. I love the handlebar. They’ve been around for a long time and I think they’re sexy. I like the small, thin one that’s well kept. Preferably, anyway. I don’t have a favourite one. I’m not really a moustache lover. For Movember, they should shave them off and leave them off and grow it for the next month and then shave it all off again.

 

Tips from Movember Canada for grooming and styling moustaches:
  • • Shampoo regularly. As becoming as they are, moustaches collect things and no matter how fine the food, it doesn't belong in your Mo.
  • • Moustache hair is coarse and benefits from regular conditioning. Massage your Mo with a dollop of conditioner then rinse thoroughly. It will make it softer to touch to both you and your intimate friends.
  • • Use a hot face washer to steam and cleanse the skin under your moustache that can suffer from drying and itching.
  • • Invest in the right equipment. A man of fine and serious moustachery should have a pair of barber scissors for precise trimming; a fine toothed comb for guidance; a bright and large mirror for a good view; a razor, a steady hand and a sensible mind.
  • • Dampen the moustache hair to trim. Wet hair is easier to cut but dry hair easier to trim. It is important to note that wet hair does bounce up when dry.
  • • Using a fine-toothed comb, tidy your moustache so the hairs run in the direction you intend them to and lasso any strays into line.
  • • Using the barber scissors, trim longer and stray hairs on the outer edge and bottom line of your moustache. You may wish to use a finger to hold or the fine toothed comb as a barber would to hold the hair as you trim.
  • • For more elaborate styles, use a fine and appropriate moustache wax to shape the remaining hair into place.

Show me the moustache money

AMHERST – The final days of November are on us and the men of our community either look a little more rugged, a little more sophisticated and, in some cases, a little more goofy than they normally do.

It’s been an active Movember for these men.

The month started with a good shave followed by care and consideration how to sport their moustaches of the month. But at the heart of Movember isn’t the mustaches – it’s health.

Registered participants created profile pages on the Movember.ca website and raised funds specifically for prostate cancer research and male mental health initiatives. Nationally, Prostate Cancer Canada – who fund a number of research initiatives – and Movember’s own Movember Foundation are the benefactors.

But it’s not easy money.

“I think if you don’t keep in mind what happens to the money the whole thing falls flat,” Movember Canada’s national director Pete Bombaci says. “We have a global action plan where 200 or so of the top researchers get together and are asked to tackle one issue globally. Our request of them is pick one thing; what is going to be the game changer and go after that.”

It’s a strategy that nets results, Bombaci says. As an example he points to Movember’s challenge last year for researchers to develop a complimentary test to the standard Prostate-Specific Antigent (PSA) Test.

A PSA test, Bombaci says, tells the patient if they have prostate cancer, but it fails to determine if it is aggressive or not. The complimentary test’s goal is to change that, helping patients learn what the road ahead will look like, determine a level of treatment and potentially offer savings to the healthcare system.

“There’s lots of upsides to challenging the researchers like that,” Bombaci says. “But one of the great things about the global action plan is the sharing. Everybody knows what everybody is researching or going to research. Just as an example, one of our researchers said during the global conference call he was about to research a certain thing and one of the U.K. researchers kind of raised his hand – in a teleconference kind of way – and said, ‘By the way, I just did that research and I’ll send you the results.’ It saves time, money and drops duplication, getting us to the quickest results.”

The other agenda Movember focuses on is men and boys mental health, a field often ignored or overlooked, Bombaci says. While there are many groups and organizations out there, funding any one mental health project is new waters for Movember Canada and, like their funding of prostate cancer research, there’s benefit to networking. Movember Canada is pushing forward with a mental health advisory board through their own Movember Foundation to guide them on their first initiative, Bombaci said. A think tank of 30 to 40 of the top minds in male mental health will present their recommendation before a request for proposals is issued.

“Then it’s open to any organization in the country – or new organization– that is already doing the work or wants to take on the challenge,” Bombaci said. “They’ll be able to apply through a transparent process open to everybody.

“I think one of the things the Movember members are proud of: fundraisers know the funds are spent efficiently and effectively.” And rightly so.

As of Nov. 21, Movember Canada has raised $20,889,785, almost twice as much as the United States (Bombaci cautions a U.S. election, Hurricane Sandy and the NHL lockout were tremendous distractions for American Mo Bros and expects 2013 to be the year the U.S. takes the leader board for fundraising).

Internationally, $62,002,371 is destined towards male mental and physical health research coffers, on top of the $170 million raised world wide since Movember as we know it took shape in 2004.

What is prostate cancer?

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer to affect Canadian men. One in seven men will be diagnosed with the disease in their lifetime.

Prostate cancer is a disease where some prostate cells have lost normal control of growth and division. They no longer function as healthy cells.

A cancerous prostate cell has the following features:
• Uncontrolled growth
• Abnormal structure
• The ability to move to other parts of the body (invasiveness).

Prostate cancer can be slow-growing and some men who develop prostate cancer may live many years without ever having the cancer detected. It is important to get screened regularly so that if you do develop prostate cancer, the appropriate action can be taken. A significant proportion of prostate cancers, if untreated, may have serious consequences.

Who gets prostate cancer?

There is no single cause of prostate cancer. However, some factors make developing prostate cancer more likely.

Age: The chance of getting prostate cancer rises quickly after a man reaches age 50. Age is the most important risk factor for prostate cancer.

Race: Prostate cancer is more common in men of African or Caribbean descent and less common in men of Asian descent.

Family history: Genetics plays a role - the risk of prostate cancer increases if close family members have had the disease.

Diet: Men who eat a low-fibre, high-fat diet have a higher rate of prostate cancer. Research suggests that saturated fat (commonly found in processed foods, whole-milk dairy products and fatty cuts of meat) increases the production of the hormone testosterone, which may help prostate cancer cells grow. 

Lifestyle: Having a high Body Mass Index (BMI) may increase the risk of prostate cancer. Being physically active is a good preventative tactic, along with losing weight and eating the right foods. Consuming lycopene (found in tomatoes and tomato products), soy, green tea and cruciferous vegetables (such as broccoli), among other foods and nutrients, may help to prevent prostate cancer.

It is possible to develop prostate cancer even when none of these risk factors is present.

Source: www.prostatecancer.ca

Amherst’s men of Movember

AMHERST – Wade LeBlanc knows the importance of raising funds to fight cancer.

He’s a recent cancer survivor and has joined the Movember cause to raise money to fight the disease that could have taken his life.

“I guess it’s a personal fight for me. I am one of the lucky ones in that I’m now cancer free, but it could very easily have gone the other way,” said LeBlanc, a teacher at E.B. Chandler Junior High School.”

LeBlanc was experiencing pains in his stomach for several months two years ago. At first he was told he had an ulcer, but when the pain returned he was sent for an MRI that revealed a tumour at the junction of the stomach and esophagus.

After undergoing several rounds of chemotherapy and having his stomach and part of his esophagus removed, he is once again healthy and determined to do everything he can to fight cancer.

“It’s something I just felt I had to do,” he said.

While Movember is mainly to promote awareness and raise funds for the fight against prostate disease, LeBlanc and other participants said it will do the same for all forms of cancer.

LeBlanc said he hasn’t had a mustache in nearly 20 years and is not quite sure what his face will look like at the end of the month.

“I’m going for the Hulk Hogan look,” he said. “I’m not sure how it will go. I think the last time I had a mustache was in Grade 9.”

Spring Street Academy phys ed teacher Daren White has waged a long, personal battle against cancer. He has been an avid fundraiser for the Canadian Cancer Society and an avid member of the Relay for Life.

He’s using Movember to raise money for the relay, but also to raise awareness about a disease that attacked him twice.

“This is all about awareness, especially among men,” White said. “We tend not to talk about certain types of cancer and we’re hesitant to go get checked. If even one person goes and has a prostate exam or gets checked for colorectal cancer or testicular cancer then it’s all worth it.”

White said he still mourns for his friend and former principal Barry Kelly.

“Barry knew something was wrong but he waited too long and when he finally went to get checked it was too late,” White said. “There’s not a day that goes by that we don’t all think of him.”

White’s not sure what kind of look he’s going to be sporting in a month. Because of his radiation treatments, he’s not sure if he will have much facial growth, but he’s going to have fun participating.

“Whatever comes is good,” White said. “I’ve never had a mustache before.”

At the end of the month, White and bunch of his co-participants are going to gather at Damaris Spa and Wellness Centre for a shave and some music.

Larry Cove said he has friends who have been affected by prostate and other forms of cancer. He said growing a mustache will be foreign to him.

“It’s been at least 25 years ago,” Cove said. “I’m not even sure I can grow one.”

A number of Amherst and area firms are participating as well, including Archway-Barnes Insurance, Amherst Toyota and IMP Aerostructures.

Adam Small pitched the idea to his co-workers at Archway-Barnes.

“It’s something we can have some fun with and raise some money and awareness about prostate and other kinds of cancer,” said Small, adding he hopes to have a full mustache by the end of the month. “I’m not sure what I’m going to get, it depends on how fast it grows.”

Stephen LeBlanc at Amherst Toyota has always had a goatee and mustache. He shaved both on Wednesday.

“It’s kind of cold,” he said on Thursday. “It’s worth it though. It’s definitely a good cause because everyone knows someone who has been affected by cancer.”

Geoff Phinney, the sales manager at Amherst Toyota, said he lost a friend to cancer several years ago.

“This is the second year I’ve done it. I can’t do a lot to support the fight against cancer, but this something I can do,” Phinney said, adding he’s going for the Juan Montoya look.