Black Spruce expanding operations in western Newfoundland

Diane
Diane Crocker
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David Murray, president and CEO of Black Spruce Exploration Corp.

CORNER BROOK  Black Spruce Exploration Corp. has started preparation for a “regular land drilling” operation in the Garden Hill area on the Port au Port Peninsula.

David Murray, president and chief executive officer of the company, said Black Spruce will be drilling on a licence that it acquired under a farmin agreement with Enegi Oil.

Murray said pending final approval from the province the targeted start of drilling is sometime in December.

“It’s already within all the guidelines that are there, so we don’t see any issues with that,” he said.

He also said the plan is to apply for approval to drill four or five other wells in the area.

“We already have the production lease,” said Murray. “It’s already approved by the province we just have to submit the specific request.”

He described the operation as “delineation development drilling,” and said the goal is to produce more oil wells. Each well will take 45 days to drill using conventional horizontal drilling.

“We’re hoping that the wells will come in around at 250 to 300 barrels a day per well,” said Murray of their potential once they move into production.

He said it’s hard to comment on the lifespan of the wells, but hopes it will be in the 15-plus year range.

The Garden Hill licence is one of nine held by Black Spruce on the west coast. Murray noted they also have two licences pending on another transaction. The licences include a mixture of onshore, offshore and onshore to offshore parcels.

Meanwhile, the drilling is not the only activity taking place on the west coast for the company.

 On Wednesday, Black Spruce officially opened an office in the R.A. Pollett Building on Riverside Drive.

Murray said with all the licence areas being close in this area it made sense to have an office in the city. “It has reasonable infrastructure that can support it.”

Murray has relocated to the city and, besides himself, the office will have an engineer, two geologists and accounting and administrative staff onsite. He said the bulk of the job opportunities with the company will be in the field and expects to hire between 30 and 35 people. Starting next month Black Spruce will have some job fairs and Murray noted it already has some applications.

“There’s a lot of good native western Newfoundlanders working in Alberta. We’re hoping to bring them back.”

Twitter: WS_DianeCrocker

Geographic location: Garden Hill, Newfoundland, Alberta

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Recent comments

  • S.McM
    September 20, 2013 - 10:52

    Check your head, 4 weeks is nonsense. There are visitors throughout the year and winter sports and recreation abound here. But how much goes into helping small business tap into this market and survive most of the year? How many languages do you see welcoming the steadily increasing foreign tourists? How many advertisements translated? Almost everyone I speak with on the mainland has never been to NL, yet they've heard great things and it's on their list. The trouble is the infrastructure is not their to attract them. There are no longer direct flight between Canada's largest cities and NL's west coast. People would love to visit here and come more often if it were more convenient. Tourism is but one way to capitalize on our scenic beauty. In a world of growing concerns over food, an expanding organic and natural foods trend, why isn't NL promoting and subsidizing the creation of unique food products (besides fish) that take advantage of these trends? Imagine, all natural Newfoundland Beef, lamb, pork etc. and what about seaweed (an entire continent enjoys this type of product) all produced in a beautiful, pristine, environment. Shelves in major supermarkets and speciality shops in big cities are full of these products from all over Canada and other parts of the world but not NL. Opportunities beyond blackened soil are limitless if people start thinking past being just a pool of skilled labour. We need to take hold of the imagination, intelligence and creativity of our people to change and improve and oil just doesn't do that, nor does it have any interest in doing so. http://www.tcr.gov.nl.ca/tcr/stats/

    • OHLONGJOHNSON
      November 01, 2013 - 09:04

      Get over it.

  • S.McM
    September 20, 2013 - 10:51

    Check your head, 4 weeks is nonsense. There are visitors throughout the year and winter sports and recreation abound here. But how much goes into helping small business tap into this market and survive most of the year? How many languages do you see welcoming the steadily increasing foreign tourists? How many advertisements translated? Almost everyone I speak with on the mainland has never been to NL, yet they've heard great things and it's on their list. The trouble is the infrastructure is not their to attract them. There are no longer direct flight between Canada's largest cities and NL's west coast. People would love to visit here and come more often if it were more convenient. Tourism is but one way to capitalize on our scenic beauty. In a world of growing concerns over food, an expanding organic and natural foods trend, why isn't NL promoting and subsidizing the creation of unique food products (besides fish) that take advantage of these trends? Imagine, all natural Newfoundland Beef, lamb, pork etc. and what about seaweed (an entire continent enjoys this type of product) all produced in a beautiful, pristine, environment. Shelves in major supermarkets and speciality shops in big cities are full of these products from all over Canada and other parts of the world but not NL. Opportunities beyond blackened soil are limitless if people start thinking past being just a pool of skilled labour. We need to take hold of the imagination, intelligence and creativity of our people to change and improve and oil just doesn't do that, nor does it have any interest in doing so. http://www.tcr.gov.nl.ca/tcr/stats/

  • S.McM
    September 20, 2013 - 10:48

    Check your head, 4 weeks is nonsense. There are visitors throughout the year and winter sports and recreation abound here. But how much goes into helping small business tap into this market and survive most of the year? How many languages do you see welcoming the steadily increasing foreign tourists? How many advertisements translated? Almost everyone I speak with on the mainland has never been to NL, yet they've heard great things and it's on their list. The trouble is the infrastructure is not their to attract them. There are no longer direct flight between Canada's largest cities and NL's west coast. People would love to visit here and come more often if it were more convenient. Tourism is but one way to capitalize on our scenic beauty. In a world of growing concerns over food, an expanding organic and natural foods trend, why isn't NL promoting and subsidizing the creation of unique food products (besides fish) that take advantage of these trends? Imagine, all natural Newfoundland Beef, lamb, pork etc. and what about seaweed (an entire continent enjoys this type of product) all produced in a beautiful, pristine, environment. Shelves in major supermarkets and speciality shops in big cities are full of these products from all over Canada and other parts of the world but not NL. Opportunities beyond blackened soil are limitless if people start thinking past being just a pool of skilled labour. We need to take hold of the imagination, intelligence and creativity of our people to change and improve and oil just doesn't do that, nor does it have any interest in doing so. http://www.tcr.gov.nl.ca/tcr/stats/

  • real westcoaster
    September 18, 2013 - 16:17

    You call four weeks of tourism an industry. what about the other eleven months ... give your head a shake.

  • geoff
    September 18, 2013 - 08:20

    I wish there was a "like" button for s. McM comment. well said sir.

  • A. Aguathuna
    September 15, 2013 - 07:38

    This will enrage the anti-fracking Luddites and the rest of the crowd that feed on government cheques and oppose industry as a toxic blight on their idyllic relaxation.

    • S. McM
      September 17, 2013 - 19:29

      What does fracking have to do with luddites? Fracking is not a new technology in fact that whole industry needs an influx of new technologies as it usually takes the oldest, cheapest and quickest route to get what it wants and move on. And as far as cheques , paid for by our taxes, going to feed a person or family in need then good. I'd much rather subsidize someone who needs it than subsidize a corporation who already pays less tax than the poorest in our country (if they pay tax at all) makes millions and reinvests less and less of its growing profits back into the local and national economies. 30-35 jobs? Bah! What about the dozens of tourism jobs, built over decades, that could be lost if Gros Morne loses its UNESCO designation.? The only money well spent from the boom&bust oil revenues over the last decade have been the NL tourism ads (tourists now outnumber residents each year!). Now people (at least those in power) seem willing to throw away a burgeoning industry that is just finding its legs for a measly handful of jobs and a potential environmental catastrophe. Money should be spent to improve tourist infrastructure so that NL can compete with long established venues in other provinces, not on subsidizing shady companies to drill holes, pump chemicals down them and 'see how it goes'...