Wild boars seized by DNR

Andrew
Andrew Wagstaff
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Department of Natural Resources officers seized nine wild boars in a raid here last week and planned to return for the 10th yesterday.

Allan Wheaton, 59, had planned to raise the animals on his own wild game farm, but now faces charges of illegally importing an exotic animal to the province.

Wild boars seized by DNR

Department of Natural Resources officers seized nine wild boars in a raid here last week and planned to return for the 10th yesterday.

Allan Wheaton, 59, had planned to raise the animals on his own wild game farm, but now faces charges of illegally importing an exotic animal to the province.

He plans to fight those charges in court.

A pigs not exotic to me, he said. Unless were talking about Miss Piggy.

Wheaton began planning for this project back in January, and carefully read over the Wild Game Farm Act, which he said permits him to raise the animals if he meets certain requirements such as veterinarians certificates, records of birth, and a secure compound, all of which he had done.

I read the act and my lawyer read the act, said Wheaton, who co-operated with the officers during the recent seizure. The department of natural resources has no mandate to stop it.

He said he feels department officials have been stalling his application process because there is an effort afoot to have wild boars removed from the list of wild game farm animals, a list that also includes bison, ostrich and emus. He chose to take the route he did to force the issue.

The animals were seized because Wheaton did not have the proper permits to import them or farm them, according to Chris Ball, a conservation officer who was one of the 10 on the scene from the department of natural resources on July 12.

Because wild boars are aggressive by nature and have a history of escaping enclosures, they pose a threat to the habitat and other local species, according to Ball.

Theyre omnivores and will eat anything from ducks to wild birds nests, eggs, small animals like fawns and even domestic pets if they get hold of one, he said. Theyre wild and opportunistic and will feed on anything they can get.

Wheaton will appear in court on Aug. 8, when he plans to enter a not guilty plea.



awagstaff@amherstdaily.com

Organizations: Department of Natural Resources

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