Tidal power's future remains promising

Andrew
Andrew Wagstaff
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Interested community members were assured here last night that the future of tidal power development remains promising, but it could be years before any equipment reaches the water.

A strategic environmental assessment on potential sites must be conducted before any tests of the new in-stream tidal technology can be conducted, department of energy representatives told a packed room of citizens at Fundy Geological Museum.

Interested community members were assured here last night that the future of tidal power development remains promising, but it could be years before any equipment reaches the water.

A strategic environmental assessment on potential sites must be conducted before any tests of the new in-stream tidal technology can be conducted, department of energy representatives told a packed room of citizens at Fundy Geological Museum.

"One thing for sure is that the strategic environmental assessment is going to have the duration of one year," said engineer Nancy Rondeaux, who works in the area of markets and climate change. "I think it's reasonable to think we could have a demonstration ready by the spring of 2009 at the earliest."

Neither Rondeaux nor policy analysis officer Sandra Farnell would guarantee that the waters near Parrsboro would be chosen for the test sites, but Rondeaux reminded the crowd that of eight potential sites identified off Nova Scotia, the top two with the most potential were the Minas Channel and the Minas Passage.

awagstaff@amherstdaily.com

Organizations: Fundy Geological Museum, Minas Channel

Geographic location: Parrsboro, Nova Scotia

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